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Modern Times
Charlie Chaplin's last outing as the Little Tramp puts the iconic character to work as a giddily inept factory employee who becomes smitten with a gorgeous gamine (Paulette Goddard). With its barrage of unforgettable gags and sly commentary on class…
The Gold Rush
Charlie Chaplin's comedic masterwork--which charts a prospector's search for fortune in the Klondike and his discovery of romance forever cemented the iconic status of Chaplin and his Little Tramp character. Shot partly on location in the Sierra Nevadas and featuring…
The Kid
Charlie Chaplin was sitting atop the movie world in 1921 when he decided (against heavy studio resistance) to make THE KID, his first dramatic comedy -- a tale of an abandoned baby adopted by an impoverished tramp and the life…
A Dog's Life
The Little Tramp (Charlie Chaplin) and his dog companion struggle to survive in the inner city. This was Chaplin's first film for First National Films.
The Pilgrim
The Tramp (Charlie Chaplin) is an escaped convict who is mistaken as a pastor in a small town church.
Shoulder Arms
Charlie Chaplin stars as a WWI boot camp private who dreams of being a hero. He is soon sent on a daring mission behind enemy lines.
Mack Sennett Collection Volume One
The Keystone Film Company, under the guidance of pioneering producer and director Mack Sennett, was the birthplace of classic American slapstick comedy. This historic studio was at one time home to a staggering number of silent screen luminaries including Mabel…
50 videos
Chaplin's Essanay Comedies Part 1
In late 1914, Charlie Chaplin was paid the then-unprecedented salary of $1,250 per week (with a bonus of $10,000) in exchange for signing a one-year contract with the Essanay Film Manufacturing Company. The resulting 14 films he created for Essanay…
6 videos
Chaplin at Keystone, Part 1
Part of the Series: Chaplin at Keystone
Part 1 Includes: Making a Living Kid Auto Races At Venice, Cal. Mabel's Strange Predicament Between Showers A Film Johnnie Tango Tangeles His Favorite Pastime Cruel, Cruel Love The Star Boarder Mabel at the Wheel Twenty Minutes of Love Caught…
12 videos
The Floor Walker
Part of the Series: Chaplin's Mutual Comedies
The Floorwalker, Chaplin's first film under his landmark contract with Lone Star-Mutual, has embezzlement as its subject. Chaplin's inspiration for the film came while he and his brother Sydney were in New York City negotiating his contract with Mutual. While…
The Immigrant
Part of the Series: Chaplin's Mutual Comedies
The Immigrant, which contains elements of satire, irony, and romance as well as cinematic poetry, endures in the twenty-first century as a comic masterpiece. The film, Chaplin's eleventh in the Mutual series, is the best-constructed of his two-reelers and was…
The Fireman
Part of the Series: Chaplin's Mutual Comedies
In Chaplin's second effort for Mutual, he portrays an inept firefighter at Fire Station 23. Charlie, still asleep, mistakes a drill bell for a fire alarm and single-handedly drives out the horse-drawn fire engine. When he discovers his error, he…
The Adventurer
Part of the Series: Chaplin's Mutual Comedies
The most popular of the Mutuals, The Adventurer begins and ends with a chase. It is the fastest-paced film of the series, and although it has more slapstick than Easy Street and The Immigrant, it is redeemed by its construction,…
Chaplin's Essanay Comedies Part 3
In late 1914, Charlie Chaplin was paid the then-unprecedented salary of $1,250 per week (with a bonus of $10,000) in exchange for signing a one-year contract with the Essanay Film Manufacturing Company. The resulting 14 films he created for Essanay…
5 videos
The Vagabond
Part of the Series: Chaplin's Mutual Comedies
The Vagabond, Chaplin's third Mutual film, was an important step in Chaplin's career, in which he interweaves pathos as an integral part of the comedy. He imposed an unlikely happy ending on The Vagabond, in which the gypsy drudge demands…
One A.M.
Part of the Series: Chaplin's Mutual Comedies
One A.M., Chaplin's fourth Mutual, is an impressive piece of virtuosity, a solo performance except for a brief appearance by Albert Austin as a taxi driver. The film is a tour de force of Chaplin's superb pantomime and comic creativity…
Chaplin's Essanay Comedies Part 2
In late 1914, Charlie Chaplin was paid the then-unprecedented salary of $1,250 per week (with a bonus of $10,000) in exchange for signing a one-year contract with the Essanay Film Manufacturing Company. The resulting 14 films he created for Essanay…
6 videos
The Rink
Part of the Series: Chaplin's Mutual Comedies
Chaplin's eighth film for Mutual, The Rink, is one of his most popular comedies. Charlie is an inept waiter who prepares the bill of Mr. Stout (Eric Campbell) by examining the soup, spaghetti, melon stains and other remnants on the…
Easy Street
Part of the Series: Chaplin's Mutual Comedies
Easy Street, his ninth film for Mutual and the most famous of the twelve, Chaplin ordered the first of the T-shaped street sets to be built that he would consistently utilize to provide a perfect backdrop to his comedy. The…
The Cure
Part of the Series: Chaplin's Mutual Comedies
The Cure, the tenth film in the series, is perhaps the funniest of the Mutuals. It was partly inspired in its setting by the Fred Karno sketch, The Hydro, which was set in a hydrotherapy clinic.